Protecting Older Adults Against Identity Theft

Major data breaches in recent months have illustrated that all of us, regardless of age, are susceptible to identity theft. But older adults can be even more vulnerable to identity theft than others. Identity theft involves a criminal stealing personal identifying information to create a new identity or to steal money from the victim. Older […]

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Adapting to Chaos

Have you ever been so deeply immersed in a situation that you couldn’t recognize how bad it was until after the fact?  Think about past jobs or relationships that ended.  Did you find yourself months or even years later thinking, “How could I have ever imagined that would work out?” “Why didn’t I listen to […]

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You’ve Got Mail – So Check It Often!

It may seem obvious that it’s important to check mail often and to respond when needed, but in the age of e-mail and online forms, sometimes so-called “snailmail” may be misplaced or forgotten – especially by those who have had to take over the task of checking the mailbox for a loved one.  At ELET, […]

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The Power of Denial in Decision-Making

Every family brings their own dynamics to the table when they start planning for the long-term care of a loved one.  Complicated relationships and family histories, guilty feelings related to “not doing enough,” and the general stress of unexpected and unplanned-for transitions all have the potential to get in the way of establishing the best […]

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People with Dementia Aren’t Children – So Don’t Treat Them That Way

It is easy to think of a person with a dementia diagnosis as being “child-like.”  After all, many of the behaviors associated with dementia – mood swings, tantrums, irrationality, forgetfulness, and vocabulary problems, for example – are similar to behaviors exhibited by young children.  These surface-level similarities lead many caregivers of people with dementia to […]

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Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Caregiving is not for the faint of heart.  If you are currently a caregiver for a relative or friend, you may be experiencing increased stress, anxiety, or depression. These symptoms commonly appear in individuals who manage the daunting task of caring long-term for another human being. You likely are already taking care of your own […]

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The Therapeutic Effect of Music for Dementia

Singer/songwriter Glen Campbell, the original Rhinestone Cowboy, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 2011 after several years of cognitive decline. Despite his diagnosis, he was able to continue to write music and perform live for more than a year. In interviews, Glen’s neurologist stated that music helped with his cognitive function, staving off symptoms of […]

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“Smart” Utensils Help Those with Tremor Feed Themselves

According to the American Academy of Neurology, approximately 10 million Americans suffer from tremor.  Tremor, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, is defined as “unintentional rhythmic muscle movements involving to-and-fro movements (oscillations) of one or more parts of the body.  It is the most common of all involuntary movements and can […]

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Why Palliative Care?

For those with a chronic illness, palliative care may be the key to getting the most out of life. Getting a diagnosis of a chronic, life-changing illness can be a real emotional blow.  The actual diagnosis usually comes after a long process of dealing with disturbing symptoms, visiting various medical specialists, and undergoing countless diagnostic tests.  In the […]

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The Importance of Social Interaction for Seniors

Among many obvious contributors to poor health in the elderly – such as lifestyle, past injuries, or limited access to medical care – there is one factor which may not be immediately obvious but has a significant impact on overall health:  isolation.  With old age comes an increased risk of isolation as the older adult […]

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